2014 Full Court National Player of the Year Breanna Stewart is on a mission to get the Connecticut Huskies to their record ninth national championship. (Photo by Glenn MacGrady)
2014 Full Court National Player of the Year Breanna Stewart is on a mission to get the Connecticut Huskies to their record ninth national championship. (Photo by Glenn MacGrady)

Stewart, DeShields headline 2014 Full Court All-American and Freshman Teams

Contributors
April 4, 2014 - 8:03am
Connecticut sophomore Breanna Stewart is Full Court's 2014 National College Player of the Year and has been named to 2014 Full Court All-American First Team. Stewart's game has only gotten better since being named Most Outstanding Player of last season's Final Four. (Photo by Stephen Slade/Courtesy UConn Athletics)

Connecticut sophomore Breanna Stewart is Full Court's 2014 National College Player of the Year and has been named to 2014 Full Court All-American First Team. Stewart's game has only gotten better since being named Most Outstanding Player of last season's Final Four. (Photo by Stephen Slade/Courtesy UConn Athletics)

Full Court congratulates our National Player of the Year and Freshman of the Year for the 2013-2014 women’s college basketball season, as well as all the talented athletes named to our NCAA Division I All-American and Freshman All-American teams.

In balloting by Full Court editors, correspondents and analysts from across America, Connecticut's Breanna Stewart narrowly edged out Stanford's Chiney Ogwumike as the top award winner with a score with 275 points to 273 out of a possible 300 points. Both players received eight first-place votes. Baylor's Odyssey Sims was the only other nominee to receive multiple first-place votes (three) and finished third in the voting with 242 points.

Here, voters were about evenly split between Ogwumike, a player who has averaged a double-double of 27 points and 12 rebounds per game while almost singlehandedly carrying her team to a deep run in the NCAA Tournament, versus Stewart, who, with similarly high-quality stats, has been the best player on what most perceive as the best team -- more balanced with multiple All-Americans -- coming into the NCAA Tournament.

North Carolina’s Diamond DeShields easily took Full Court's 2014 Freshman-of-the-Year honors with 238 points and 11 first place-votes. Finishing second was Baylor's Nina Davis with 189 points and three first-place votes. No other nominee received more than one first-place vote.

Read on to see who else earned this year's Full Court All-American collegiate honors.

Full Court 2014 NCAA Division I Women's Basketball National Player of the Year: Breanna Stewart, University of Connecticut

There are a lot of words that can be used to describe Breanna Stewart as a basketball player, but above all else "winner" may be most apt. At both the high school and the collegiate level, her teams have been champions, and she has had a great deal to do with making that so. Most who are reading this are well aware that last year, as a mere freshman, Stewart led Connecticut to the 2013 NCAA Division I title, and in doing so was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player, and that this year, she has the undefeated Huskies back on track for a repeat appearance in the Final Four. Stewart has had the assistance of a talent-packed program including multiple All-Americans in that endeavor, however.

Fewer may know that this this upstate New York native also led her Cicero-North Syracuse High School team to the New York State overall large school high school championship, with perhaps only one other Division I prospect (who was expected to play another sport in college) on the squad. In her senior year in high school, the young prep standout led Cicero-North Syracuse to victory at the Nike Tournament of Champions over a Bolingbrook (Ill.) High School team whose roster was loaded with at least eight future Division I players, including future UConn teammate Morgan Tuck. Stewart's ability to score, defend, rebound, block shots and handle the basketball allowed her to control the tempo against a much deeper and far more talented team.

While still in high school, Stewart won gold as a member of the 2011 USA Basketball U19 World Championship team and competed as the youngest member of USA Basketball's 2011 USA Pan American Games Team, becoming just the second high school player to play for Team USA in the Pan Am Games. Though the U.S. fell short of the medal stand, Stewart started all four games in the Pan Ams, averaging team highs of 15.3 points, 11.3 rebounds and 1.1 blocks per contest. What was most impressive is that she was outplaying all of her teammates, many of whom already had two years of college ball under their belts, while competing against teams with players well into their 20s. Before that, Stewart had been a member of USA Basketball from her days on the U16 team in 2009. With continued progression, a place on the Olympic team is a likelihood in 2020 and a possibility in 2016.

Stewart closed out her prep career being named a McDonald's All-American and was selected as both the Morgan Wooten and the Gatorade National High School Player of the Year.

At Connecticut, Stewart's freshman year suffered a mid-season slump (by her high standards), but she still made the Full Court All-Freshman First Team last year. She might have collected even more accolades had the voters been able to consider her postseason performance in which she elevated her play to a whole new level.

This season Stewart has performed outstandingly pretty much wire to wire. She has averaged 20 points, eight rebounds, three assists and three blocks per game, while averaging 50 percent from the field and 37 percent from beyond the arc. Her efficiency score of 23 ranks eighth in the NCAA, and she has accomplished all this while leading the Huskies to an undefeated 37-0 season that has seen double-digit routs of many of the best teams in the country. Areas of marked improvement over her freshman year include more than doubling her assists per game, increasing her 3-point shooting by about 1.5 percent and adding just under six points to her scoring average while showing greater on-court poise.

Unsurprisingly, Stewart was named American Athletic Conference Player of the Year and a Wooden All-American. She remains a finalist on all the major National Player of the Year watch lists. If she were eligible for the 2014 WNBA draft, she would likely already go as the No. 1 pick, but UConn fans can delight in seeing her perform for the Blue & White for two more seasons.

2014 Full Court NCAA Division I Women's Basketball All Americana

Editor's Note: Please note that the following selections represent the player’s body of work for the season through the NCAA Division I Women’s Basketball Tournament Round of 32. Players for each five-member team were selected based on merit, without regard to playing position (center, forward, guard). Players who missed a significant portion of the regular season were not considered. Within each team, players are listed alphabetically.

2014Full Court  NCAA Division I Women's Basketball All-American Team
First Team
Player Height Class Position School
Kayla McBride 5-11 SR G Notre Dame
Chiney Ogwumike 6-3 SR F Stanford
Odyssey Sims 5-8 SR G Baylor
Breanna Stewart 6-4 SO F Connecticut
Alyssa Thomas 6-2 SR F Maryland


McBride Drive
Full Court First Team All-American: Kayla McBride, Notre Dame University

Comments: After being named to last season's Full Court All-American Third Team, McBride moves up to our First Team this season. Her play typifies this year's Irish offense: playing hard, taking what's given, unselfish and pretty deadly if left open on the perimeter. Named Atlantic Coast Conference Player of the Year, as well as first team All-ACC, by the conference coaches, McBride's scoring (18 ppg), rebounding (6 rpg) and assists (4 apg), are all up slightly from last year with biggest improvement is in three-point shooting (up over 5% from last year). McBride, a Wooden All-American and Naismith Award finalist, shoots an efficient 47 percent from the field and 37 percent from long range. Look for McBride to be off the board in the top five picks in the upcoming WNBA Draft. (Photo by Matt Cashore/Courtesy Notre Dame Athletic Media Relations)


Ogwumike shot
Full Court First Team All-American: Chiney Ogwumike, Stanford University

Comments: Ogwumike returns as a First Team pick for the second year in a row having been a Third Team selection as a sophomore in 2012. Her performance this season has been second to none: The repeat PAC-12 Player of the Year is among NCAA Division I leaders in points (27 per game -- third-most in D I), rebounds (12 per game -- eighth-best in the NCAA), field-goal percentage (61 percent -- among the NCAA's top 25) and double doubles (24 and counting). Perhaps most amazing is that she continues to succeed offensively when the opposition knows she will most likely do her scoring within a few feet of the basket, succeeding by combining superior athletic balance, hand-eye coordination, ability to go either left or right and finally use of the glass when needed to make the shot. Also, do remember that the next scoring option (Amber Orrange) is averaging only around 10 points per game, making Ogwumike the focal point of double and triple teams on a nightly basis. Ogwumike is expected to bring her "A" game every night and generally does. Having carried her team to the Final Four, look for her to join her sister Nneka in the WNBA after being selected as one of the top two picks in this spring's draft. (Photo by Lee Michaelson/FullCourt.com)
Sims with ball
First Team All-American: Odyssey Sims, Baylor University

Comments: Expectations for Baylor coming into this season were not high, given the graduation not only of Brittney Griner (last season's Full Court National Player of the Year) but also an easy 80 percent of last year's offensive production. However, Sims, a Full Court All-American Second Team member in 2012 and 2013, and the Full Court Freshman of the Year in 2011, almost effortlessly slid from a role as complement to Griner to that of the team's biggest star and scoring leader. En route to being named Big 12 Player of the Year, Sims led a Baylor squad made up largely of newcomers and former bench players back to the Big 12's regular-season (tie) and tournament championships and an appearance in the NCAA Tournament's Elite Eight. She raised her scoring average (28 ppg) by just over 15 points per game, the second highest in all of NCAA Division I. Meanwhile, her field-goal shooting percentage (45 percent) dropped by only about three percentage points, and she actually raised her 3-point shooting accuracy (41 percent) by about six percent. Despite her increased individual scoring production, Sims is still a facilitator, passing out five dimes per game, only about one less assist per game than last season. Sims is the winner of this season's Frances Pomeroy Naismith Award, a Wooden All-American and a Naismith National Player of the Year finalist. Look for Sims to join Ogwumike as one of the two top picks in this spring's WNBA Draft. (Photo Courtesy Baylor University)


Alyssa Thomas
First Team All-American: Alyssa Thomas, University of Maryland

Comments: This marks Thomas's third year as a member of the Full Court All-American First Team; this was also Thomas' third season as the media's choice for ACC Player of the Year. Thomas is a master stat stuffer: She is the only player in Division I with four triple doubles this season and ranks high in double doubles as well with 24 to date. One of just two double-digit scoring options for the Terrapins (the other being freshman point guard Lexie Brown, who averages 10.1 points per game), much is demanded of Thomas on a daily basis to insure victory for her team. Her game exceptional power, speed and athleticism with shooting skill (19 ppg on 52 percent from the field), plus extraordinary ball handling and above-average passing ability for a player at her position. (Thomas, a power forward, leads the Terps in assists with more than four per game and an ATO of 1.7:1 that would make coaches happy with most point guards.) Thomas is also her team's leader on the boards (11 rbg, which puts her among the NCAA's top-20 rebounders) and in steals (nearly 1.6 per game). Thomas consistently delivers for Maryland, not only individually, but also by making her teammates better, and this year has taken the Terps all the way to the Final Four. Look for Thomas, a Wooden All-American and Naismith National Player of the Year finalist, to be drafted in the top five this spring. (Photo courtesy University of Maryland Athletics.)


2014 Full Court  NCAA Division I Women's Basketball All-American Team
Second Team
Player Height Class Position School
Stefanie Dolson 6-5 SR C Connecticut
Bria Hartley 5-8 SR G Connecticut
Jewell Loyd 5-10 SO G Notre Dame
Shoni Schimmel 5-8 SR G Louisville
Meighan Simmons 5-9 SR G Tennessee


Dolson Drive
Full Court All-American Second Team: Stefanie Dolson, University of Connecticut

Comments: Dolson returns from last season as a Full Court All-American Second Team selection; she was also a Full Court All-Freshman team selection in 2011. Selected to the  American Athletic Conference First Team this season, Dolson averaged a near double-double of 12 points and nine rebounds per game, to which she adds three assists and two blocks per outing. She deserves much credit for improving her shooting range (a 56-percent shooter from close to midrange, Dolson can now knock down threes with 30-percent accuracy), passing ability and conditioning while in Storrs. Responsible for the second triple-double in UConn history, look for Dolson to be taken in the top six of this spring's draft. (Photo by Steve Slade/Courtesy Connecticut Athletics Media Relations)
Hartley Drive LoydDrive
Full Court All-American Second Team: Bria Hartley, University of Connecticut

Comments: A Full Court All-American Third Team selection in 2012 and First Team All-Freshman selection in 2011, Hartley garners Second Team honors this year thanks to marked improvement in scoring average (16 ppg, up about 7 ppg over previous years) and field-goal shooting percentage (48 percent, up about nine percent). An All-AAC First Team honoree this season, Hartley is also good for roughly four rebounds, four assists, two steals and a block per outing.  With an ability to hit the three-ball (37 percent) and the midrange jumper, look for Hartley to go in the top 10 of the upcoming WNBA draft. (Photo by Steve Slade/Courtesy Connecticut Athletics Media Relations)
Full Court All-American Second Team: Jewell Loyd, University of Notre Dame

Comments: Loyd moves from our All-Freshman First Team in 2013 to Second-Team All-American this year. Chosen ACC Tournament MVP and named to the All-ACC First Team this season, Loyd averaged 19 points, six rebounds and two assists per game. A superior athlete, who shoots 53 percent from the field and 39 percent from beyond the arc, Loyd combines above-average basketball IQ with superior ability to shoot from distance as well as take the ball to the basket.  One could argue she was the best player for the Irish this season. A successful pro career awaits starting in 2016. (Photo by Matt Cashore/Courtesy Notre Dame Athletic Media Relations)
Schimmel Shot Simmons Shot
Full Court All-American Second Team: Shoni Schimmel, University of Louisville

Comments: Shimmel was a member of the Full Court All-Freshman First Team in 2011. While some might have questioned Schimmel's judgment and shot-selection in the past, she has matured considerably in her senior year, becoming a facilitator as well as Louisville's go-to shooter. This season she led the Cardinals in both scoring (17 ppg) and assists (four apg), earning All-AAC honors and leading her team to the NCAA Elite Eight.  As the 2014 winner of the State Farm College 3-Point Competition, Schimmel's reputation is centered around her ability to shoot the 3-ball (the more clutch the situation, the better). Schimmel knocks down the long balls at a 37-percent clip and her 108 long distance makes rank second in the NCAA this season. But her ability to get to the basket in tight spaces is underappreciated. Look for her to be drafted in the latter half of the first round later this month. (Photo by Michelle Hutchins/University of Louisville)
Full Court All-American Second Team: Meighan Simmons, University of Tennessee

Comments: Simmons moves up from Full Court All-American Third Team honors she earned in 2013. Prior to that she had been a Full Court All-Freshman First Team selection in 2011.  Simmons, who averaged 16 points, three rebounds and two assists per game while shooting 42 percent from the field and 36 percent from beyond the arc, was selected to the All-SEC First Team and was the media's selection for SEC Player of the Year. While her shot selection has improved from prior years, at times she can still be a high-volume shooter, who can oftentimes overlook open teammates who are enjoying much better shooting nights than she.  At the same time, when she explodes for high double-digits, she can totally reverse the momentum of a game. It will be interesting to see where she is picked in the upcoming WNBA Draft probably lower first to high second round pick for an "instant offense" role. (Photo by Lee Michaelson/FullCourt.com)


2014 Full Court  NCAA Division I Women's Basketball All-American Team
Third Team
Player Height Class Position School
Isabelle Harrison 6-3 JR C Tennessee
Jordan Hooper 6-2 SR F Nebraska
Samantha Logic 5-9 JR G Iowa
Maggie Lucas 5-8 SR G Penn State
Tiffany Mitchell 5-9 SO G South Carolina


Isabelle Harrison Skies
Full Court All-American Third Team: Isabelle Harrison, University of Tennessee

Comments: Harrison, a First Team All-SEC selection, was the Lady Vols' "Steady Eddie" in the middle, averaging 14 points, nine rebounds, two assists, a block and a steal per game. She came up even bigger during the SEC Tournament, where she averaged 19 pointss and nine rebounds per session en route to being named the tournament's MVP. Harrison also broke Chamique Holdsclaw's junior record for double-doubles with 18 for the season. (Photo by Matthew S. DeMaria/Tennessee Athletics)
Hooper Drive Logic Drive
Full Court All-American Third Team: Jordan Hooper, University of Nebraska

Comments: The coaches' selection as Big Ten Player of the Year, Hooper averaged 20 points and nine rebounds per game this season, whie shooting 43 percent from the floor and 36 percent beyond the arc. Equally comfortable posting up, or spotting up behind the arc, look for her to be picked in the low-first to early-second round in the upcoming WNBA draft. (Photo Nebraska Athletics Communications)
Full Court All-American Third Team: Samantha Logic, University of Iowa

Comments: Named to the All-Big Ten First Team this season, Logic is a point guard with superior court vision and shooting ability, who also goes hard to the boards, becoming one of just two players in NCAA Division I to record three triple-doubles this season. The junior is also the only player in Division I to have averaged at least 13 points, six rebounds (Logic averaged seven) and seven assists (Logic had eight) per game this year. (Photo by Brian Ray/hawkeyesports.com)
Lucas Drive Tiffany Mitchell
Full Court All-American Third Team: Maggie Lucas, Penn State University

Comments: Lucas returns to the Full Court All-American team this year after having earned a berth on the Full Court All-American Second Team last year; she was also named to the Full Court All-Freshman Second Team in 2011. Voted Big Ten Player of the Year by the media who cover the league, Lucas averaged 21 points per game on 40-percent shooting from the field and 37-percent from downtown. To her credit, she has added a nice pull-up jumper to her long-distance shooting ability while in State College. She is expected to be taken in the low-first to early-second round in the upcoming WNBA draft. (Photo by Mark Selders/Penn State Athletic Communications)
Full Court All-American Third Team: Tiffany Mitchell, University of South Carolina

Comments: Selected by league's coaches as SEC Player of the Year, Mitchell was the Gamecocks' primary perimeter scorer, lending balance to the team's strong inside presence. She averaged 15 points, six rebounds, four assists and two steals per contest on efficient 51-percent field-goal shooting an an impressive 52-percent from 3-point range. Mitchell was the only unanimous selection to this year's All-SEC First Team and was also named to the SEC All-Defensive Team. (Photo by Lee Michaelson/FullCourt.com)


Full Court All-American Honorable Mention

2014 Full Court  NCAA Division I Women's Basketball All-American Team
Honorable Mention
Player Height Class Position School Awards and Accomplishments
Natalie Achonwa 6-3 SR F Notre Dame All-ACC Second Team. 14 ppg, 7 rbg, 3 apg. Field-goal percentage - 60 percent; total shooting percentage - 63 percent. Efficiency (17).
Jillian Allyne 6-3 SO F Oregon All-PAC 12 First Team; PAC-12 All-Defensive Team. Leads country in rebounding (16 rbg) and double-doubles (27). Ranks second in Division I in efficiency (28); 18th in scoring (22 ppg). Total shooting percentage - 62 percent.
Jerica Coley 5-8 SR G Florida International Conference USA First Team. Ranks No. 1 among active Division I players in scoring (30 ppg), seventh in efficiency (23). Ranks fifth all-time among Division I players with 3,107 career points.
Diamond DeShields 6-1 FR G North Carolina 2014 Full Court Freshman of the Year (see below). ACC Freshman of the Year. All-ACC First Team. Wooden Award nominee.
Natasha Howard 6-3 SR C Florida State All-ACC First Team. 14 double-doubles. Ranks 10th among all Division I players in efficiency (23). Led Florida State with 21 points, nine rebounds and two steals per game. Field-goal percentage: 60 percent. Total shooting percentage - 63 percent.
Tricia Liston 6-1 SR G Duke All-ACC First Team. Wooden Award nominee. Second-place, State Farm College 3-Point Championship. Set Duke single-season record for 3-pointers made (88) and career 3-pointers (252). Ranked second among all Division I players in 3-point percentage (48 percent), 13th in total shooting percentage (68 percent). Led Duke in scoring (17.2 ppg).
Ebony Rowe 6-1 SR F Middle Tennessee State Conference USA Player of the Year. All-CUSA First Team. Ranked fifth nationally among Division I players in efficiency (24) and double-doubles (26), 11th in rebounding (12 rbg) and 21st in scoring (22 ppg).


2014 Full Court NCAA Division I National Freshman of the Year: Diamond DeShields, University of North Carolina

DeShields Soars
University of North Carolina Freshman (No. 23) Diamond DeShields is both the Full Court and the ACC Freshman of the Year after leading the Tar Heels to the NCAA Elite Eight and averaging 18 points, five rebounds, three assists and two steals per game this season. (Photo courtesy of UNC Athletic Communications)


Comments: DeShields was first introduced to Full Court readers back in 2009, when she was in the eighth grade in Georgia, with the following description: "Medium build with great jumping ability; can shoot over opponents or take ball to the basket; likely one of the top 2013 class members. Father is former Major League Baseball player Delino DeShields."

"Likely one of the top 2013 class members," proved to be an understatement. While still a high school junior, DeShields helped lead the U.S. U17 team to gold in the 2012 FIBA U17 World Championships, where she was named the tournament's Most Valuable Player. DeShields also has gold to her credit from the 2012 3x3 U18 World Championships, the 2010 U18 Championship Team, and as the youngest member of the 2011 U19 World Championships Team. As a high school senior, she was chosen as the 2013 State Farm/WBCA, Naismith and Gatorade National High School Player of the Year and named a McDonald's and WBCA All-American. 

DeShields separated herself from our field in her freshman college season by leading her Tar Heels to a strong second half of the regular season and a postseason run to the Elite Eight of the NCAA Tournament. Selected Atlantic Coast Conference Freshman of the Year and named to the All-ACC First Team, DeShields led the Tar Heels in scoring (18 points per game on 43-percent field-goal shooting) and steals (two per game). Although she seems to prefer to operate in the wing to baseline area, what makes her so special is her ability to create a shot from almost anywhere on the court, using a combination of her size, athleticism and ballhandling skills. Furthermore, like her name, Diamond seems to shine on the biggest stages, coming up big in close games when her team needs her most.

True, DeShields is not yet a finished product. She has lapses in judgment, at times forcing up bad shots. Though she knocked down a team-second-best 48 3-pointers this year, her accuracy from long range (27.9 percent) could stand some work. Her technical foul for taunting an opponent after netting a 3-pointer (her fifth of the game) in the ACC Tournament semifinals, a close game which North Carolina ultimately lost by just five points, is ample proof that, however talented she might be, DeShields is still very much a freshman.

Yet, that talent, first observed five years ago, is undeniable. Barring injuries, look for DeShields to be a multiple year All-American and a top pick in the 2017 WNBA Draft.

2014 Full Court NCAA Division I Women’s Freshman All-Americans


2014 Full Court  NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Freshman All-American Team
First Team
Player Height Position School
Alaina Coates 6-4 C South Carolina
Nina Davis 5-11 F Baylor
Diamond DeShields 6-1 G North Carolina
Kelsey Plum 5-9 G Washington
Amanda Zahui B 6-5 C Minnesota


Coates Shoots Nina Davis soars
Full Court Freshman All-American First Team: Alaina Coates, University of South Carolina

Comments: Coates, the SEC Freshman of the Year, is another athlete with good genes: Her uncle is NFL tight end Ben Coates. Like a tight end, the Gamecocks freshman has good hands.  She finishes strongly in traffic in the lower paint and for the season shot over 61 percent from the field, and averaging about 12 points while playing under 20 minutes per game. Her eight rebounds per game placed her among NCAA Division I's top-10 freshmen in that category. (Photo courtesy South Carolina Athletics Media Relations)
Full Court Freshman All-American First Team: Nina Davis, Baylor University

Comments: Davis, the Big 12 Freshman of the Year and an All-Big 12 First Team honoree, was one of this season's pleasant surprises. Ranked below the top-50 recruits as a high school senior, Davis was not even considered to be the best of the Lady Bears' incoming freshmen. However, Davis proved the scouting reports wrong with the high level of quality and consistency in her performance. She quickly earned a spot in the starting rotation where she became Baylor's leading rebounder (8.9 rbg) and second-leading scorer (15 ppg). She ranked second among Division I freshmen in total shooting percentage (64 percent), second in efficiency (18), fifth in rebounding, ninth in field-goal percentage (61 percent) and among the top-20 in scoring. Davis is very undersized for a player who scores in the lower paint but her supersized motor more than makes up for any perceived lack of height as she gave the Lady Bears a reliable second scoring option to Odyssey Sims. (Photo courtesy Baylor University)
Plum Pass Amanda Zahui B
Full Court Freshman All-American First Team: Kelsey Plum, University of Washington

Comments: Plum, a McDonald's All American as a high school senior, was expected to do well as a collegian and did not disappoint. Starting every game this season and sharing the point guard duties, Plum not only led the Huskies in scoring, but ranked second among all Division I freshmen with 21 points per game. The PAC 12 Freshman of the Year, Plum also ranked seventh in the nation in both made threes (74) and efficiency (15). (Photo by Red Box Pictures/Courtesy University of Washington)
Full Court Freshman All-American First Team: Amanda Zahui B, University of Minnesota

Comments: The redshirt freshman from Sweden proved to be one of the top young post players in Division I ball.  The Big 10 Freshman of the Year and an All-Big 10 Second Team selection, Zahui B. ranked first among conference freshmen, second among Division I freshmen and 13th among all Division I players in rebounding (12 rbg); first among Big Ten, and fourth among all Division I, freshmen in blocks (3 bpg); and third among Big Ten frosh in scoring (15 ppg). Zahui B also led all Division I freshmen in efficiency (19) and ranked second nationally amongst freshmen with 18 double doubles. (Photo Courtesy University of Minnesota Athletics)


2014 Full Court NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Freshman All-American Team
Second Team
Player Height Position School Comments
Lexie Brown 5-9 G Maryland A lot was expected of Brown, daughter of former NBA player Dee Brown, and more than not she has delivered for the Terrapins. Supplanting two incumbent point guards, this ACC All-Freshman Team member took over the starting role at the postion after just four games, helping leading Maryland to the Final Four as the team's second leader in both scoring (10.1 ppg) and assists (4.2 apg).
Nia Coffey 6-1 F Northwestern Coffey was selected as a member of the Big Ten All-Freshman team and All-Big Ten First Team by the league's coaches (All Big Ten Second Team by the media). The leading force on a young team that relied heavily on three freshmen, Coffey finished in the top ten among all conference players, regardless of class, in points (15 ppg), rebounds (8 rbg) and blocks (2 bpg). She ranked fifth among Division I freshmen in efficiency (16) and among the nation's top-10 frosh in both rebounding and blocked shots. Coffey combines the ability to score from the perimeter, favoring the wing to baseline area, with sufficient power to get inside and score near the basket.
Kaela Davis 6-2 W/G Georgia Tech Davis, daughter of former NBA player Antonio Davis, was chosen as a member of the ACC All-Freshman team as well as the All-ACC Second Team.  She was first among the conference's freshmen in both scoring (19 ppg, which placed her fourth among all Division I freshmen) and threes made (83, good for third place among freshmen nationally). An interesting fact to note is that Davis, Maryland's Lexie Brown and UNC's Diamond DeShields all played as eighth graders on the same club team (Georgia Ice) coached by Antonio Davis.
Allisha Gray 6-0 G North Carolina Gray, a member of the ACC All-Freshman team, was the Tar Heels' second-leading scorer (14 ppg) to Diamond DeShields, while also contributing six rebounds per game. Gray ranked third among ACC freshmen in scoring and third in 3-pointers made (60). Though Gray did not generate quite as much scoring output as her FOY teammate DeShields, her shooting accuracy was actually better, both from the floor (48 percent, to DeShields' 43 percent) and from beyond the arc (42 percent to DeShields' 29 percent).
Sydney Wiese 6-0 G Oregon State Wiese, an All-PAC 12 First Team and All-Freshman Team honoree, led the Beavers in scoring (14 ppg) and assists (4 apg) while helping her team into the NCAA Tournament for the first time in nearly two decades. Wiese led all Division I freshmen in 3-pointers made (104), ranked second nationally among freshmen in total scoring percentage (64 percent), and second among PAC 12 freshmen in 3-point field-goal percentage (44 percent).


2014 Full Court  NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Freshman All-American Team
Third Team
Player Height Position School Comments
Lindsay Allen 5-7 G Notre Dame Every quality team needs a good point guard and Allen has stepped in admirably for graduated superstar Skylar Diggins. With 122 assists entering the NCAA Tournament, Allen had already broken the school's freshman record for assists in a season. Shooting 52 percent from the field and 42 percent from downtown, Allen's total shooting percentage (63 percent) ranked fourth in the nation among Division I freshmen.
Natalie Butler 6-5 C Georgetown The unanimous choice for Big East Freshman of the Year, Butler ranked first amongst Big East freshmen in scoring (14 ppg). She broke the Big East single-season rebounding record with 425, and her 13 rebounds per game placed her first among all Division I freshmen, and fifth among all Division I players regardless of class, in that category. Butler also owned the third-best efficiency rating (18) among D-I freshmen.
Aerial Powers 6-0 G Michigan State Selected to both the All-Big Ten First Team and the Big Ten  All-Freshman Team, Powers' 13 points led the Spartans in scoring and placed her fourth among the league's freshmen. She also placed fourth among Big Ten freshmen in assists (2 apg), and ranked third among Big Ten freshmen and ninth among all Division I frosh with eight rebounds per contest.
Tyler Scaife 5-9 G Rutgers Rutgers' second-leading scorer with 14 points per game, Scaife has helped the Scarlet Knights to the WNIT championship game this weekend. Chosen AAC Freshman of the Year and named to the All-AAC Second Team, Scaife finished first among the conference's freshmen in both scoring and field-goal percentage (45 percent).
Sydney Stipanovich 6-3 C Penn Stipanovich was the first player ever to be unanimously chosen as Ivy League Freshman of the Year; she was also honored as  Ivy Defensive Player of the Year and named to the All-Ivy Second Team. She ranked first among Ivy League freshmen in rebounds (9 rbg) and blocks (4 bpg) and third in both points scored (12 ppg) and field-goal percentage (44 percent). Those same numbers placed her second nationally among NCAA Division I freshmen in blocks, sixth in rebounding and 10th in efficiency (15).


2014 Full Court NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Freshman All-American Team
Honorable Mention
Player Height Position School Awards and Achievements
Jessica Jackson 6-3 F Arkansas SEC All-Freshman Team; All-SEC Second Team. Among SEC freshmen: first in scoring (16 ppg); second in 3-point makes (48); fourth in 3-point field-goal percentage (38 percent). Led Arkansas in scoring, rebounds, blocks, free-throw percentage and 3-point makes.
Stephanie Mavunga 6-3 F North Carolina Ranked first among ACC freshmen and seventh among Division I freshmen in rebounding (8 rbg); first among ACC frosh and fifth nationally among freshmen in blocks (3 bpg); and seventh among ACC freshmen in scoring (11 ppg).
Raigyne Moncrief 5-10 G Louisiana State SEC All-Freshmen Team. Among SEC freshmen, fifth in scoring (10 ppg), fourth in assists (2 apg). Eleventh among Division I freshmen in steals (2 spg).
Amber Porter 6-3 F/C Stetson College SportsMadness Mid-Major National Freshman of the Year; Atlantic Sun Freshman of the Year, All-Freshman Team; All-Atlantic Sun First Team. Among Division I freshmen nationally, ranked first in blocked shots (four bpg, fourth among all Division I players regardless of class), fourth in efficiency (16) and ninth in rebounding (8 rbg); Among Atlantic Sun freshmen ranked first in scoring (14 ppg), rebounds, blocks and field-goal percentage (55 percent).
Leticia Romero 5-8 G Kansas State Unanimous selection to Big 12 All-Freshman Team; named to All-Big 12 Second Team. Only freshman guard in Division I with more than 400 points, 100 rebound, 100 assists and 50 steals. Among Division I freshmen, ranked third in assists (5 apg), 11th in steals (2 spg), 17th in efficiency (14) and 20th in scoring (14 ppg). Responsible, in scoring and assists for 45 percent of Kansas State's made field-goals.
Caira Washington 6-2 F George Washington University Atlantic 10 Freshman of the Year, All-Freshman Team; All-Atlantic 10 Third Team. Among all Division I freshmen, ranked third in rebounding (9 rbg), 12th in efficiency (14) and 15th in total scoring percentage (58 percent). Among all Atlantic 10 players, regardless of class, ranked first in total rebounds, first in offensive rebounds and third in field-goal percentage (58 percent).

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